Posts Tagged ‘healthcare’

By Matt Horan

This week on the Sojourners website, Jim Wallis wrote about a movement of over 100 former politicians from both sides of the aisle who have come forward with a statement urging reform in the way our current politicians go about their work.  I’m not always very eager to jump on the Jim Wallis bandwagon, as I feel like he’s too easily dragged into the mud himself, especially in his recent feud with Glenn Beck.

However, this is welcome news.  Sojourners is urging the adoption of a “Civility Covenant,” and it is long overdue.

We act as if facts matter.  We act as if gaining supporters to my position is based on convincing people of what is true and what is false.  Once they see that the facts support my side, they’ll be won over.  But facts don’t matter.  Truth doesn’t matter.  What motivates us is not our facts, but our commitments. (more…)

By Matt Horanrabbit_foot

A professor was giving a big test one day to his students. He handed out all of the tests and went back to his desk to wait. Once the test was over the students all handed the tests back in. The professor noticed that one of the students had attached a $100 bill to his test with a note saying “A dollar per point.” The next class the professor handed the graded tests back out. This student got back his test, his test grade, and $64 change.

It seems that, if we have enough money, we can solve any problem.  Being sued?  Get a great lawyer.  Kids not learning enough?  Send them to private school.  Health problems?  See a great doctor and get some medicine prescribed.  Don’t like how you look?  Join a gym, get some cosmetic surgery, or buy the South Beach Diet book.

I’ll confess that I’m not always a big fan of generosity.  I’d much rather have a lot of money and buy myself something nice.   (more…)

By Matt HoranChurch and State

          How can we know when we’ve got enough government?  You can’t walk by a newspaper stand or channel surf at all these days without cruising past the debate about health care reform.  On one side, people argue that getting the government more involved will allow more people to have more access to adequate health care.  On the other side, people argue that getting the government more involved will not allow more people to have more access to adequate health care.  What’s the average newspaper reader or channel surfer to think?  How can we know whose facts to believe?  How do we know when we need more government?  How do we know when we’ve got enough?  How can we know when we need a little less? (more…)